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Featured Advisor



Srbo Radisavljevic
Managing Principal/Investment Advisor

Edge Portfolio Management

City:Northbrook

State: IL



BIOGRAPHY:
At Edge, a low client to advisor ratio allows for personal and customized service for each individual.  Our goal is to work as a team for each client to provide not only portfolio management but wealth coordination and financial planning.  We make every effort to have frequent communication with our clients and to provide timely response to calls and emails.  I also enjoy spending time with my wife and three kids, following Chicago sports, enjoying ethnic cooking, and serving as a school board member for Norridge School District 80.

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Working Moms Discuss Their Guilt

Almost 80 percent of working moms feel they are falling behind, either at work or at home, because of the workload required doing both.

| BY Kent McDill

The employment environment for women continues to improve, and women are making inroads daily in corporate settings and climbing the ladder to success in numerous industries and businesses.

But that success comes with a cost, the same cost that has haunted women with children since moms first began putting children into day care facilities in order to work.

A survey by Care.com of almost 1,000 working mothers with at least one child under the age of 18 revealed that approximately 25 percent cry by themselves at some point during the week because of the stress of maintaining a job and a household.

Care.com is a website that helps working parents find caregivers for children or aging parents or assists caregivers looking for work. It has almost 12 million members worldwide.

The respondents to the Care.com survey worked an average of 37 hours per week, and said more than twice that much time was spent on dealing with household chores, cleaning, getting children to and from childcare facilities, getting them to doctor’s appointments or after-school events and activities.

“We wanted to understand what the point was where somebody raised their hand and said I can’t take it. I need help.” Said Donna Levin, co-founder of care.com, told Yahoo! Parenting. “But just how far people push things surprised us.”

The survey revealed that 80 percent of working mothers suffer stress over the amount of work they have to do both professionally and at home, while 79 percent claim to be falling behind in one area or another because of the workload.

The guilt over working instead of mothering shows in that more than 50 percent of mothers surveyed said they worry about missing a big event ion their child’s life due to working. One-third are either call in sick or are late to work once a week due to the stress.

While more than 50 percent believe they are not spending enough time with their family, 11 percent went farther down the guilt path, believing they are not forming lasting relationships with their children because of their work commitment.

And what about getting help to reduce the workload at home? While 73 percent said such an alternative is too expensive, 29 percent said they would feel guilty handing off that assignment to another person.

“We want to share the data so people can realize there are not alone,’’ Levin said. “The survey found that 62 percent of women think everyone else has an easier time getting everything done and somehow they are the only ones having trouble. This mentality has to stop.”

 



About the Author


Kent McDill

kmcdill@spectrem.com

Kent McDill is a staff writer for Millionaire Corner. McDill spent 30 years as a sports writer, working for United Press International and the Daily Herald of Arlington Heights, Ill. From 1988-1999, he covered the Chicago Bulls for the Daily Herald, traveling with them every day through the nine-month season. He also covered the Bulls for UPI from 1985-88, and currently covers the team for www.nba.com. He has written two books on the Bulls, including the new title “100 Things Bulls Fans Should Know And Do Before They Die’, published by Triumph Books. In August 2013, his new book “100 Things Bears Fans Should Know And Do Before They Die” gets published.

In 2008, he resigned from the Herald and became a freelance writer. The Herald hired him to write business features and speeches for the Daily Herald Business Conferences and Awards presentations.

McDill also writes a monthly parenting column for the Herald’s Suburban Parent magazine.

McDill is the father of four children, and an active fan of soccer, Jimmy  Buffett and all things Disney.