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Featured Advisor



Kim Butler
President

Partners for Prosperity, Inc.

City:Mt. Enterprise

State: TX



BIOGRAPHY:
I have 20+ years of handling alternative investments in cash, growth and income for clients nationwide.  I strive to help my clients with all things financial in every way possible over the phone and the web.  I own an alpaca farm which I enjoy working during my downtime.  I also enjoy gardening, writing and reading books.  I also train other advisors on Prosperity Economics.

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What Comes After Cyber Monday? #Giving Tuesday

Learn more about #Giving Tuesday, a social media movement to increase charitable giving this holiday season.

| BY Adriana Reyneri

We give thanks on Thanksgiving, and go shopping on Black Friday and Cyber Monday. How about a national day for giving? That’s the thinking behind #GivingTuesday, a growing social media movement to make November 27 a day for giving back.

 “Giving Tuesday is intended to open the holiday season on a philanthropic note and put heart back into the holidays,” Sarah Renusch,  of the global aid organization World Vision, said in a statement. “World Vision is encouraging Americans to dedicate this day to getting back to the true meaning of the holidays. It is about community, not commercialism, giving, not receiving.”

#GivingTuesday was incubated at the 92nd Street Y in New York City and has been joined by a long and diverse list of founding partners, including the United Nations Foundation, the Financial Times, Unliver, the University of Tennessee, Mashable and scores of charities such as Habitat for Humanity, the United Way and others. Founders invite supporters to spread the word through their social media networks, including Facebook and LinkedIn, and are soliciting bloggers and other social media influencers to act as “social media ambassador” to the effort.  Supporters can follow the movement on Twitter through @GivingTues and can use the #GivingTuesday hastage.

Supporters are also urged to plan a #Giving Tuesday activity, big or small, and to spread word of the event through social media. “All that matters is that you are giving back and helping to spread the word about #GivingTuesday,” according to the website. Suggestions include a neighborhood yard or bake sale to benefit a charitable group, visit a nursing home, clean up a park or donate some of your canned food to the food pantry.  Last but not least, “help generate a buzz.”

The World Vision Holiday Giving Survey released yesterday indicates that social media can influence charitable giving. Nearly half (49 percent) or survey participants indicate that social media has affected their charitable giving this holiday season and 39 percent say social media has increased their awareness of others’ needs. The survey also found that 83 percent of Americans would prefer to receive a “meaningful gift” helping another rather than a traditional present, but the share of shoppers who say they are likely to give a charitable gift as a holiday present has declined from 51 percent in 2011 to 45 percent this year.

Charity-themed gifts may be less popular this year, but the vast majority of Americans appear inclined to donate to charities this holiday season, according to a Millionaire Corner monthly survey for September, which finds that 73 percent of investors plan to give. Of these, the largest share (44 percent) plans to give between $100 up to $500. Twenty-two percent plan to give less, while 15 percent plan to give $500 up to $1,000, and 19 percent plan to give $1,000 or more.  The likelihood of giving increases with wealth.  Nearly 82 percent of Millionaires plan to donate to charity over the upcoming holidays, and more than one-third plans to give $1,000 or more.