Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
Register for our daily updates!


Featured Advisor



Srbo Radisavljevic
Managing Principal/Investment Advisor

Edge Portfolio Management

City:Northbrook

State: IL



BIOGRAPHY:
At Edge, a low client to advisor ratio allows for personal and customized service for each individual.  Our goal is to work as a team for each client to provide not only portfolio management but wealth coordination and financial planning.  We make every effort to have frequent communication with our clients and to provide timely response to calls and emails.  I also enjoy spending time with my wife and three kids, following Chicago sports, enjoying ethnic cooking, and serving as a school board member for Norridge School District 80.

Click to see the full profile


Share |

Millionaires More Likely to Invest Globally

Financial advisors that cater to the wealthy should carefully follow global news that could impact clients’ portfolios and be ready to justify their decisions in close communication with those clients, according to a recent survey by Spectrem Group, a company that specializes in retirement for the affluent.  The survey measured the responses of 1,146 wealthy investors with $1 million in investable assets about their investment attitudes and where they look to for advice.

41% of surveyed responders rely primarily on their own investment research and analysis, while 40% said they rely on a trusted advisor.  Of investors with less than $100,000 in assets, only 34% do their own research and 31% enlist a financial advisor for investment advice.  13% of them relied on family and friends for advice, whereas only 1% of millionaire investors relied on such sources.

“Wealthy investors want to at least feel that they are involved in decision,”  said Tom Wynn, director of affluent research at Spectem Group.  “So even if you’re actually making the decision about their portfolios, make them a part of it and explain why you are doing something,”  he said.  “‘Trust me’ is gone. Transparency and participation is in.”  Even if they feel that their advisor didn’t do a bad job during the financial crises, many wealthy investors feel their advisors could have done better, Wynn said.

Two-thirds of millionaires say they are “likely” or “more likely” to invest internationally with increased focus on global issues and how those issues impact their portfolios.  Only 40% of investors with less than $100,000 in investable assets plan to invest globally.

A recent survey by Millionaire Corner showed that 56% seniors over the age of 60 want to invest internationally, a sign of less risk tolerance as they near retirement.  The survey also found that women are typically less risk tolerant than men.  51% of women said they intended to invest globally compared to 61% of men.

“Advisors have a tendency to think all that matters is what’s happening in the U.S., but that isn’tFinancial advisors that cater to the wealthy should carefully follow global news that could impact clients’ portfolios and be ready to justify their decisions in close communication with those clients, according to a recent survey by Spectrem Group, a company that specializes in retirement for the affluent.  The survey measured the responses of 1,146 wealthy investors with $1 million in investable assets about their investment attitudes and where they look to for advice.

 

41% of surveyed responders rely primarily on their own investment research and analysis, while 40% said they rely on a trusted advisor.  Of investors with less than $100,000 in assets, only 34% do their own research and 31% enlist a financial advisor for investment advice.  13% of them relied on family and friends for advice, whereas only 1% of millionaire investors relied on such sources.

 

“Wealthy investors want to at least feel that they are involved in decision,”  said Tom Wynn, director of affluent research at Spectem Group.  “So even if you’re actually making the decision about their portfolios, make them a part of it and explain why you are doing something,”  he said.  “‘Trust me’ is gone. Transparency and participation is in.”  Even if they feel that their advisor didn’t do a bad job during the financial crises, many wealthy investors feel their advisors could have done better, Wynn said.

 

Two-thirds of millionaires say they are “likely” or “more likely” to invest internationally with increased focus on global issues and how those issues impact their portfolios.  Only 40% of investors with less than $100,000 in investable assets plan to invest globally.

 

A recent survey by Millionaire Corner showed that 56% seniors over the age of 60 want to invest internationally, a sign of less risk tolerance as they near retirement.  The survey also found that women are typically less risk tolerant than men.  51% of women said they intended to invest globally compared to 61% of men.

 

“Advisors have a tendency to think all that matters is what’s happening in the U.S., but that isn’t going to work with wealthy investors anymore.”  Wynn says. going to work with wealthy investors anymore.”  Wynn says.

To read the original article, follow link to RJandMakay.com.