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Featured Advisor



Ed Meek
CEO/Investment Advisor

Edge Portfolio Management

City:Winfield

State: IL



BIOGRAPHY:
At Edge, a low client to advisor ratio allows for personal and customized service for each individual.  Our goal is to work as a team for each client to provide not only portfolio management but wealth coordination and financial planning.  We make every effort to have frequent communication with our clients and to provide timely response to calls and emails.  I also enjoy spending time with my wife and three kids, playing and following basketball, playing golf, and participating as an advisory board member for Breakthrough Urban Ministries.

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Desk Workers vs. Non-Desk Workers: Who's Got More Job Satisfaction?

While desk workers said that being in an office helped keep them in the loop and build closer relationships with their peers and company executives, non-desk workers said they liked the variety and flexibility in their day.

| BY Donald Liebenson

Who’s got more job satisfaction, the desk worker or the non-desk worker? A new CareerBuilder survey finds both perks and pitfalls for both.

Members of the desk set are equally as happy as their non-desk counterparts with their current roles, the survey found, While desk workers said that being in an office helped keep them in the loop and build closer relationships with their peers and company executives, non-desk workers said they liked the variety and flexibility in their day. Nearly four-in-ten (38 percent) said they had no complaints about their work environment compared to 14 percent of desk workers.

Desk workers were more likely to report that they currently earn or are close to earning their desired salary (71 percent vs. 61 percent), while twice as many non-desk workers as desk setters reported earning less than $35,000 (40 percent vs. 20 percent).

But what’s money, they say, if you don’t have your health? Here, non-desk workers seem to have the edge. Nearly half (46 percent) of desk workers said they have gained weight in their current position compared to 30 percent of non-desk workers. Nearly six-in-ten categorize themselves as overweight compared to 51 percent of workers in non-desk jobs.

Desk and non-desk workers alike said they are likely to experience high stress levels at work (30 percent and 29 percent, respectively), the CareerBuilder survey found. But non-desk workers expressed a higher tendency toward burnout (61 percent vs. 57 percent of desk workers.

Desk and non-desk workers see much to like about their roles. More than half of desk workers appreciate the access to technology and the Internet (72 percent), having a non-physically demanding job (60 percent) and the structure of a routine (59 percent).

Non-desk workers most like the ability to stay physically active (68 percent), the variety in their workday (54 percent) and not being stuck in front of a computer all day (51 percent).

On the debit side, desk workers most dislike not being more physically active and staring at a computer all day (56 percent each), and being stuck inside (51 percent).

For non-desk-workers, the major disadvantages of their work environment are exhaustion from being on their feet all day (35 percent), being prone to injury or illness (24 percent) and less recognition for their efforts (17 percent).

Related story: What does job satisfaction mean to Millennials?



About the Author


Donald Liebenson

dliebenson@millionairecorner.com

Donald Liebenson writes news and features for Millionaire Corner. He has been published in the Chicago Tribune, The Chicago Sun-Times, The Los Angeles Times, Fiscal Times, Entertainment Weekly, Huffington Post, and other outlets. He has also served as a marketing writer for Chicago-based Questar Entertainment and distributor Baker & Taylor.  

A graduate of the University of Southern California, he is married with a college-age son. He also writes extensively about entertainment.